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Stephen's Hole

Posted on March 8, 2017 at 11:05 PM

Stephen's Hole

 

Our blog topic for today is entitled “Stephen's Hole. In this blog, I will share a true story that happened to me while doing research on the “Legend of J.C. Brown” in Mt. Shasta, California in 2009.

 

Not long after arriving in Mt. Shasta, I raised some serious eyebrows from the locals when they learned that I was looking for artifacts or giant skeleton remains that might be connected to the “Legend of J.C. Brown.” For anyone who is not familiar with this legend, you need only go to the video tab and click on the “Legend of J.C. Brown category to watch the documentary movie.

 

It was also in this same time period in the summer and fall of 2009, that I was doing a local Internet and cable talk show at the local college in Weed, California. The program was entitled “Legend, Mystery and More.” The program was specifically about Mt. Shasta and all of the legends that surrounded it. When I wasn't filming an episode, I could be found hiking on Mt. Shasta.

 

Native American legends also share stories about an ancient race of people who they refer to as “The Tall Ones” who lived under the bowels of Mt Shasta and may still be living there today.

 

On July 1st, of 2009, I was interviewed by Charlie Unkerfer of the Mt. Shasta Herald.

The article was released in the Sunday edition of the newspaper. The legend instantly created a buzz around the city of Mt. Shasta. I was now under the spotlight. There was nowhere that I could go without a stranger coming up to me and asking about what if anything that I had found.

 

In September of 2009, I left Mt. Shasta and moved to Ashland, Oregon to begin production on a Internet radio program. For the next four to six weeks, the crew and I spent all of our time working on the program. Mt. Shasta was the furthest thing from my mind or so I thought.

 

In late October, I received a phone call from Arthur Aday. Arthur hosted his own Internet

talk show at the college. I had been a guest on his program several times. He even doubled as a cameraman of a few of my television programs. As a result, we became good friends. Arthur was my bud.

 

 

Arthur started out the conversation informing me a rather large hole had been dug on or around Mt. Shasta. He then went on to say, that the hole, was about 15 feet wide, and was estimated by some observers to be at least 60 feet deep. It was a massive hole.

I the asked if he knew who may have dug the hole?

 

Arthur then answered, “Well the United States Forest Service and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (F.B.I.) were at the television studio today looking for you to answer some questions. Apparently, they think you had something to do with digging the hole.

 

Immediately, the Art Bell Coast To Coast am broadcast with Art's guest Mel Waters popped into my mind. The “Mel's Hole” program was a hot topic in the Pacific Northwest. Mel's Hole” was claimed by Mel Waters to be over fifteen miles deep.

 

The FBI asked Audra Gibson, the Program Director, if you ever mentioned digging any holes in or around Mt. Shasta? Her and I quickly came to your defense. They then asked if they could see all of the programs that I had done with the college. Arthur went on to say, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, purchased every one of the Legend, Mystery and More episodes that were recorded and aired at the college. They also purchased (3) three of Arthur's “A Day in Telos” programs. Arthur ended the phone call by saying,”Dude you're famous!”

 

I hung up the phone and couldn't stop laughing. When I finally stopped laughing, my friend who was standing nearby, asked what was so funny?” I jokingly answered” You've heard of Mel's Hole, now there's a second hole, its being called Stephen's Hole.”

 

I will now include the Mt. Shasta Herald newspaper article for your perusal:

 

 

Friday

Oct 23, 2009 at 12:01 AM Jul 1, 2012 at 10:12 AM

Whatever their purpose was, the people who dug a deep and wide hole by hand on National Forest property on Mt. Shasta this summer put in a great deal of effort.


Steve Gerace


Whatever their purpose was, the people who dug a deep and wide hole by hand on National Forest property on Mt. Shasta this summer put in a great deal of effort.Then they abandoned it.


US Forest Service law enforcement officer Carmen Kinch says she knows who is responsible and she’s proceeding with filing charges. The hole, about 15 feet wide, was estimated by some observers to be 60 feet deep.It was refilled by the Forest Service last Friday because it presented a safety hazard, Kinch said. The hole was dug on the site of the Mountain Thin project. Many of the trees in the area had previously been marked with paint, but that paint had faded over time. In July of this year, Kinch said the trees were repainted with blue rings on the bark. That’s when the hole was discovered, but the diggers were not seen.


Kinch said she was out of the area working on assignment in July and into August, but has been investigating the hole since she returned. She says she now knows who is responsible but has yet to make contact with that person. She said he is not a local resident. She believes the goal of the illegal hole digging enterprise was to find “valuable minerals.”


Remnants from the operation, including a wire above the hole that was connected to two trees and had a pulley mechanism on it, were left behind. Also left behind was a ladder leaning up against a tree near the hole and numerous buckets. large pile of dirt and rocks surrounded the hole.


This was not an easy enterprise.One very large boulder was perched on a ledge just above the hole. It appeared that the diggers may have intentionally gone around it because it was too large to move.


One recent observer at the hole site noted with irony that one of the items that remained at the bottom of the hole was a bottle of “SmartWater.”Two of the charges that Kinch said she plans to bring against the person responsible for the hole are damage to a National Forest and removing natural resources without a permit – “and anything else I can come up with,”?she added.

 

In closing, if anyone would to comment about this topic, I look forward to reading what you have to say.

 

Respectfully,

 

Stephen Sindoni

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1 Comment

Reply Elijah
8:56 PM on March 31, 2017 
Thanks for sharing, Stephen.

I look forward to speaking with you about this again soon.

We're going to get to the bottom of this.